In the Press

Nine Unforgettable Portraits

Memoirist Marjorie Simmons once wrote:

Why are readers so thirsty for memoir? Because we want to know how people navigate complexity and tragedy, how they heal from hurts—physical and psychic—how joy can be found or rediscovered. Memoirs remind us to recommit or rewrite our values, to stoke or re-stoke passions for life, for people. The story of a life—no matter what kind of life—is never really about an individual.

In that sense, a good memoir paints a portrait, not only of an individual, but of a time and place, laden with societal challenges or breakthroughs. In the books described below, their authors have painted such a portrait, focused on an individual or a few individuals with much in common, that shows us much about the wider world they inhabit, the highs and lows of their journeys, their greatest fears and triumphs. All the elements of a great story. Snuggle in.

To read the whole story click here.

 
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Creativity Covid Style

 

Helen C. Escott didn’t intend to have two books published this fall, but as a retired civilian member with the RCMP and COVID-19 leaving her housebound for most of 2020, she found ample time to write. 

Her plan with Flanker Press was to release one book, Operation Wormwood: The Reckoning in September and then a second book, In Search of Adventure: 70 Years of The Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Newfoundland and Labrador at a later date. 

However, like most things in relation to 2020, those plans changed. 

Read the full story here.

 
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On the CBC Cross Talk show, host Ramona Dearing talks with Helen C. Escott about a subject that can be taboo for some people. And that is menopause. It can be a difficult time, no question. But today we're hoping to poke some fun at the indignities that can come with menopause. Writer Helen Escott is standing by to share some stories. Listen to the whole show at CBC Cross Talk

 

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

Menopause, the lighter side.

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The Newfoundland and Labrador Royal Canadian Mounted Police is celebrating its 70th anniversary, and is doing so by encapsulating some of the stories of the force over the last seven decades. On Friday, the RCMP celebrated the launch of In Search of Adventure: 70 Years of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Newfoundland and Labrador, written by Helen Escott, a former civilian member of the RCMP. The book is a collection of stories from RCMP veterans—including three of the last surviving Newfoundland Rangers—and helps to tell the history of the force. Read it here

 

Untold Stories Featured in New Book Marking RCMP’s 70th Year in NL

Untold Stories Featured in New Book Marking RCMP’s 70th Year in NL

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Helen C. Escott is a retired civilian member of the RCMP in Newfoundland and Labrador and the author of two crime thrillers. She served as the communications lead on many high-profile events, including 9/11. She shared more of that experience on a past episode of Blue Line, The Podcast. We bring you clips from that conversation here.

 
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“I really had to start at the beginning:” Helen Escott, RCMP communications

The best gifts are made at home. That may be truer this holiday season than ever before. In a year that has kept so many of us close to home, doing our part by staying apart, the most memorable gifts are the ones imagined, planned, and stitched together right here in Atlantic Canada. When you give a local book, you give an escape, an experience, a world. And you give a piece of local culture that lasts a lifetime. 


Order: In Search of Adventure - 70 Years of the RCMP in Newfoundland and Labrador & The Reckoning - the conclusion to the Operation Wormwood series here

 

Atlantic Books Holiday Gift Guide

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I don’t think it is too much of a stretch to say that Helen C. Escott is Newfoundland’s premier crime-thriller author. Her novels such as Operation Vanished (2019, Flanker Press) and now the two Operation Wormwood books will cement her career as such. All three books lean toward the “cozy’ side of the crime-thriller genre, but they have touches of grittiness that keeps things a little on the edgy side too. Her decades of service as a civilian employee of the RCMP serves her well when it comes to the force’s officers (who are styled after real-life members of the RCMP and RNC) including the crimes and criminals they encounter as well as the investigative process. For the full story, click here.

 

Operation Wormwood: The Reckoning by Helen C. Escott

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On the Day of Reckoning, everyone is called to account for their actions. Award-winning crime fiction writer Helen C. Escott is back with the thrilling conclusion to Operation Wormwood – The Reckoning published by Flanker Press. For the full story, click here.

 

The Reckoning – The conclusion to Operation Wormwood has arrived!

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Helen Escott is a retired civilian member of the RCMP who created the force’s N.L. Media Relations/Communications Unit and has published a memoir and a pair of crime thrillers. Here she has compiled 80-odd, usually quite personal, tales inter-linked by RCMP service: most of the book is composed of brief biographies which taken together “tells the stories of who we are.”

The history of the RCMP in our province is largely post-Confederation, when 55 Rangers and 35 members of the Newfoundland Constabulary transitioned to the Canadian police organization (although the first Newfoundlander to join the RCMP – Const. Ernest W. Peyton of Twillingate – actually did so in 1888).  Read full story here.

 
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JOAN SULLIVAN: Book explores 70 years of the RCMP in N.L.

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Book commemorating 70 years of the RCMP in Newfoundland and Labrador released Friday

 

Helen C. Escott has done a remarkable job at capturing the stories of these brave and humble men and women while at the same time making a great contribution to the unique history of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police within Newfoundland and Labrador. This is a wonderful piece of Canadiana that will be enjoyed by both law enforcement personnel and civilians alike and will leave readers with an incredible appreciation for the men and women on our frontlines. In Search Of Adventure ~ 70 Years of The Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Newfoundland and Labrador is a Flanker Press publication. Read full story here

 
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Author Biography: Helen C. Escott

Writer's Alliance Newfoundland & Labrador

Helen C. Escott is used to blazing trails. She is a retired Civilian Member of the world-renowned Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). In 1998, she created the RCMP’s Media Relations/ Communications Unit in Newfoundland and Labrador where she became the first female Senior Communications Strategist and Media Relations spokesperson for the RCMP in that province.  Read full article.

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Book commemorating 70 years of the RCMP in Newfoundland and Labrador released Friday

When George Powell joined the RCMP in 1953, the new officer from Ontario found himself in Newfoundland and Labrador, working with members of the former Newfoundland Ranger Force.

“Some of the people would call the office and they’d want to know, are you a Canadian Mountie or are you one of ours?” Powell said.

The RCMP had taken over and absorbed the Rangers on Aug. 1, 1950, a year after Newfoundland joined Confederation.

Compared to now, those days were pretty rudimentary, Powell says.

“It was a different atmosphere, a different life,” he said.

Prisoner escorts were all done by rail, and there was no calling for backup on a two-way radio. Sometimes, especially in rural parts of the province, the single officer who manned a rural detachment might be gone for almost a week. Their wives would take over, despite women not officially being allowed to join the RCMP until 1974.

“She would look after everything, taking the phone calls, helping people, even looking after prisoners,” Powell said.

Powell finished his career as a chief superintendent in British Columbia, but moved back to Newfoundland soon after he retired 32 years ago.

On Friday, Powell was back at RCMP headquarters in St. John’s to celebrate the release of a book called "In Search of Adventure — 70 Years of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Newfoundland and Labrador," by Helen C. Escott and published by Flanker Press.

Read full article

 
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Writing World: Helen C Escott Operation Vanished

By Nick Travis

Operation Vanished explores Newfoundland in a time not so long ago, when things were very different.

Helen Escott knows crime. In 1998, she became the founding member and Senior Communications Strategist of the Newfoundland and Labrador RCMP’s Media Relations and Communications Unit – a position she held for 18 years. Her behind-the-scenes knowledge of the world of police work has helped Escott pen truly gripping crime novels, where one almost feels like they’re watching over a real police investigation. Read full article.

 
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Book commemorating 70 years of the RCMP in Newfoundland and Labrador released Friday

When George Powell joined the RCMP in 1953, the new officer from Ontario found himself in Newfoundland and Labrador, working with members of the former Newfoundland Ranger Force.

“Some of the people would call the office and they’d want to know, are you a Canadian Mountie or are you one of ours?” Powell said.

The RCMP had taken over and absorbed the Rangers on Aug. 1, 1950, a year after Newfoundland joined Confederation.

Compared to now, those days were pretty rudimentary, Powell says.

“It was a different atmosphere, a different life,” he said.

Prisoner escorts were all done by rail, and there was no calling for backup on a two-way radio. Sometimes, especially in rural parts of the province, the single officer who manned a rural detachment might be gone for almost a week. Their wives would take over, despite women not officially being allowed to join the RCMP until 1974.

“She would look after everything, taking the phone calls, helping people, even looking after prisoners,” Powell said.

Powell finished his career as a chief superintendent in British Columbia, but moved back to Newfoundland soon after he retired 32 years ago.

On Friday, Powell was back at RCMP headquarters in St. John’s to celebrate the release of a book called "In Search of Adventure — 70 Years of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Newfoundland and Labrador," by Helen C. Escott and published by Flanker Press.

Read full article

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Blue Line, The Podcast: Helen Escott, RCMP Newfoundland & Labrador’s first communications strategist

By Renee Francoeur

We are celebrating women in law enforcement this fall!

Each month, Blue Line, The Podcast is profiling some of the many passionate officers and civilian employees in law enforcement agencies who strive every day to make a difference.  Listen to podcast.

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Newfoundland crime thriller pairs police and archivist

By Barb Sweet

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. — There’s a new kind of crime fighter in the fictional world, and author Helen C. Escott based the archivist helping her new thriller’s main police investigator on The Rooms’ own Larry Dohey.


Dohey, director of programming and public engagement and author of the popular Archival Moments blog, makes his fictional debut as Larry Morgan in Escott’s book, in which Morgan helps main character Cpl. Gail McNaughton delve into the mystery of missing and murdered women cases dating back to the 1950s.  Read full article.

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Cool People Profiles: Operation Wormwood by Helen C. Escott

About the Book... A Newfoundland and Labrador Crime Thriller

An elderly man is carried into the emergency department of the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, setting off a chain of events that leaves doctors mystified. He is the first of many victims suffering from severe nosebleeds and excruciating pain. Dr. Luke Gillespie and Nurse Agatha Catania investigate their symptoms but are unable to diagnose them. The only thing they have in common is Sgt. Nicholas Myra, an investigator with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary.  Read full article.

Find your next great Canadian Read: Operation Vanished

About the Book... A Newfoundland and Labrador Crime Thriller

In 2018, the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary executed Operation Wormwood, an investigation into a mysterious disease that targeted some of the worst criminals this province has ever seen. Read full article.

Book Reviews to Ponder: Operation Vanished by Helen C. Escott

Nine stars

After loving Helen C. Escott’s debut novel about policing in Newfoundland and Labrador, I could not wait to get my hands on this second piece. Set again on The Rock, Escott takes readers into a darker and oft-forgotten side of missing person inquiries from yesteryear. Read full article.

Helen C. Escott's 'Operation Wormwood' is one heck of a thriller

By Joan Sullivan

On a foggy St. John's night, two men enter the emergency room of the Health Sciences Centre. They could be father and son, the young man supporting his elderly dad who is clearly in distress. But they aren't. They are a priest and archbishop. Father Horan has finally persuaded his superior, Archbishop Keating, to seek medical aid. For months Keating has been suffering from physical pain, nose-bleeds, and a great thrirst- he longs for water but can't drink it and protests it's actually vinegar. These symptoms have now escalated to a crisis point. Read full article.

 

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